Friday, 30 October 2015

Next Time You're Decorating, Don't Try This On Your Living-Room. Or Your New Workshop. Or Your New Shed. Especially In Wales.



USS Mahomet (ID-3681) in port, circa November 1918.
The ship has a Dazzle Camouflage scheme that distorts the appearance of her bow.
This File: 1 March 2012.
Naval History and Heritage Command website.
Author: Unknown.
(Wikimedia Commons)



painted by Tobias Rehberger in 2014,
to commemorate the use of Dazzle Camouflage in World War I.
Photo: 13 February 2015.
Source: Own work.
Author: DieSwartzPunkt.
(Wikimedia Commons)



English: Dazzle Camouflage Ships, Liverpool, England.
Français: Camouflage en cale sèche à Liverpool.
Date: 1919.
Current location: English: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Français: Musée des beaux arts du Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source: Own work.
This File: 24 January 2009.
User: Mzajac.
(Wikimedia Commons)



Royal Mail Ship (RMS) Olympic,
Titanic's sister ship, in Dazzle Camouflage
while in service as a Troopship during World War I.
Date: World War I.
Author: Unknown.
(Wikimedia Commons)



displaying a coat of Dazzle Camouflage.
Date: 1918.
Source: File:HMS Argus (1917).jpg
Author: Unknown US Navy Personnel, 1918.
(Wikimedia Commons)


It is not inconceivable that all the above may appeal to certain skilled artists/engravers/sketchers, especially in Wales, who may wish to apply any of, or all, the above to their new workshop/shed.

In which case, nobody will be able to find it.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...