Tuesday, 22 November 2016

The Anglican Cathedral In Norwich.



Norwich Cathedral.
Illustration: PINTEREST


The Nave,
Norwich Cathedral.
Photo: 29 July 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Attribution: "Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0"
(Wikimedia Commons)


The history of Norwich Cathedral.
Available on YouTube at


Anglican Chant:
Psalm 124 (Nisi Quia Dominus).
Choir of Norwich Cathedral.
Available on YouTube at


English: The view of the Spire of Norwich Cathedral from The Cloisters.
Français: La tour, la flèche et le transept sud de la cathédrale de Norwich, vus depuis le cloître.
Photo: 29 July 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Attribution: "Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0"
(Wikimedia Commons)

The following Text is from Wikipedia - the free encyclopaedia.

Norwich Cathedral is a Cathedral, located in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Dedicated to The Holy and Undivided Trinity. It is the Cathedral Church for The Church of England Diocese of Norwich and is one of the Norwich Twelve Heritage Sites.

The Cathedral was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream-coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two Churches were demolished to make room for the buildings. The Cathedral was completed in 1145, with the Norman Tower, still seen today, topped with a wooden Spire, covered with lead. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of The East End and Spire, but, since the final erection of the Stone Spire in 1480, there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric.


The Choir,
Norwich Cathedral.
Photo: 29 July 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Attribution: "Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0"
(Wikimedia Commons)

The large Cloisters have over 1,000 Bosses, including several hundred carved and ornately-painted.

Norwich Cathedral has the second-largest Cloisters in England, only smaller to Salisbury Cathedral. The Cathedral Close is one of the largest in England, and one of the largest in Europe, and has more people living within it than any other Close.

The Cathedral Spire, measuring 315 ft (96 m), is the second-tallest in England, despite being partly rebuilt after being struck by lightning in 1169, just twenty-three months after its completion, which led to the building being set on fire.

Measuring 461 ft (140.5 m) long and, with The Transepts, 177 ft (54 m) wide, Norwich Cathedral was the largest building in East Anglia.


The Cloisters,
Norwich Cathedral.
Photo: 24 July 2011.
Source: Own work.
Author: .
(Wikimedia Commons)

The structure of the Cathedral is primarily in The Norman Style, having been constructed at the behest of Bishop Herbert de Losinga who had bought the Bishopric for £1,900 before its transfer from Thetford.

Building started in 1096 and the Cathedral was completed in 1145. It was built from flint and mortar and faced with cream-coloured Caen limestone. It still retains the greater part of its original stone structure. An Anglo-Saxon settlement and two Churches were demolished to make room for the buildings. A Canal was cut to allow access for the boats bringing the stone and building materials, which were taken up The River Wensum and unloaded at Pulls Ferry, Norwich.

The Ground Plan remains almost entirely as it was in Norman times, except for that of the Eastern-most Chapel. The Cathedral has an unusually long Nave of fourteen Bays. The Transepts are without Aisles and The East End terminates in an Apse with an Ambulatory. From the Ambulatory, there is access to two Chapels of unusual shape, the Plan of each being based on two intersecting circles.This allows more correct orientation of the Altars than in the more normal kind of radial Chapel.

The Crossing Tower was the last piece of the Norman Cathedral to be completed, around 1140. It is boldly-decorated with circles, lozenges and interlaced Arcading. The present Spire was added in the Late-15th-Century.


"Abide With Me".
Sung by The Choir of Norwich Cathedral.
Available on YouTube at

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