Tuesday, 23 September 2014

Saint Linus. Pope And Martyr. Feast Day, Today, 23 September.


Text  and Illustrations from Wikipedia - the free encyclopaedia,
unless otherwise stated.



English: The Cupola of the Basilica of Saint Peter, Rome.
Italiano: Città del Vaticano - Cupola della Basilica di S. Pietro.
Photo: January 2006.
Source: Own work.
Author: MarkusMark.
(Wikimedia Commons)



Pope Linus (+ 79 A.D.)
Date: Copied from en: to he: by he:User:Ches.
Source: http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Linus2.jpg
Author: Unknown.
(Wikimedia Commons)


Pope Linus (+ 79 A.D.) was, according to several early sources, the second Bishop of Rome and is listed by the Catholic Church as the second Pope.

His Papacy lasted from circa 67 A.D., to his death, circa 79 A.D. According to other early sources, Pope Clement I was the second Pope; per the Annuario Pontificio, Clement was the fourth Pope. Among those considered by the Catholic Church to have held the position of Pope, only Clement, Linus and Peter are specifically mentioned in the New Testament.

The earliest witness, to Linus's status as Bishop, was Irenaeus, who, about the year 180 A.D., wrote: "The Blessed Apostles, then, having founded and built up the Church, committed into the hands of Linus, the Office of the Episcopate."

The Oxford Dictionary of Popes interprets Irenaeus as classifying Linus as the First Bishop of Rome. Linus is presented, by Saint Jerome, as "the first, after Peter, to be in charge of the Roman Church", and, by Eusebius, as "the first to receive the Episcopate of the Church at Rome, after the Martyrdom of Saint Peter and Saint Paul". Saint John Chrysostom wrote: "This Linus, some say, was second Bishop of the Church of Rome, after Peter", while the Liberian Catalogue presents Peter as the first Bishop of Rome and Linus as his successor in the same Office.




The Liber Pontificalis also presents a List that makes Linus the second in the Line of Bishops of Rome, after Peter, while also stating that Peter Ordained two Bishops, Linus and Cletus, for the Priestly Service of the Community, devoting himself instead to Prayer and Preaching, and that it was to Clement that he entrusted the Church as a whole, appointing him as his successor.

Tertullian, too, wrote of Clement as the successor of Peter. Jerome classified Clement as "the fourth Bishop of Rome, after Peter" (i.e., fourth in a series that included Peter), adding that, "most of the Latins think that Clement was second after the Apostle."

The Apostolic Constitutions denote that Linus, who was Ordained by Paul, was the first Bishop of Rome and was succeeded by Clement, who was Ordained by Peter. Cletus is considered Linus's successor by Irenaeus, and the others cited above, who present Linus either as the first Bishop of Rome or, if they give Peter as the first, as the second.

The Liberian Catalogue and the Liber Pontificalis date Linus's Episcopate to 56 A.D. – 67 A.D., during the Reign of Nero, but Jerome dates it to 67 A.D. – 78 A.D., and Eusebius puts the end of his Episcopate at the second year of the Reign of Titus (80 A.D.).




Irenaeus identifies Linus with the Linus mentioned in 2 Timothy 4:21 as an associate of the Apostle Paul. Others, of the sources mentioned above, say the same.

According to the Liber Pontificalis, Linus was an Italian, born in Volterra, in the Tuscany Region. His father's name was recorded as Herculanus. The Apostolic Constitutions name his mother as Claudia (immediately after the name "Linus", in 2 Timothy 4:21, a Claudia is mentioned, but the Apostolic Constitutions does not explicitly identify that Claudia as Linus's mother).

According to Liber Pontificalis, Linus issued a Decree that women should cover their heads in Church, created the first fifteen Bishops, and that he died a Martyr and was buried on the Vatican Hill, next to Peter. It gives the date of his death as 23 September, the date on which his Feast is still Celebrated. His name is included in the Roman Canon of the Mass.

With respect to Linus's supposed Decree requiring women to cover their heads, J.P. Kirsch commented in the Catholic Encyclopedia: "Without doubt, this Decree is apocryphal, and copied by the author of the Liber Pontificalis from the First Epistle of Saint Paul to the Corinthians (11:5) and arbitrarily attributed to the first successor of the Apostle in Rome. The statement made, in the same source, that Linus suffered Martyrdom, cannot be proved and is improbable. For, between Nero and Domitian, there is no mention of any persecution of the Roman Church; and Irenaeus (1. c., III, iv, 3), from among the early Roman bishops, designates only Telesphorus as a glorious Martyr."




The Roman Martyrology does not list Linus as a Martyr. The entry about him is as follows: "At Rome, Commemoration of Saint Linus, Pope, who, according to Irenaeus, was the person to whom the Blessed Apostles entrusted the Episcopal care of the Church, Founded in the City, and whom Blessed Paul the Apostle mentions as associated with him."

A tomb, found in Saint Peter's Basilica, in 1615, by Torrigio, was inscribed with the letters LINVS and was once taken to be Linus's tomb. However, a note by Torrigio shows that these were merely the last five letters of a longer name (e.g. Aquilinus or Anullinus). A Letter on the Martyrdom of Peter and Paul was once attributed to Linus, but, in fact, dates to the 6th-Century.

The Feast Day of Pope Linus is 23 September.

[Editor: There is a famous Character, in the Strip Cartoon "Peanuts", named Linus van Pelt, who is Charlie Brown's blanket-toting best friend and Sally's love interest. Linus is the most insecure, but the smartest out of all the Characters.]




The following Text is from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal.

Saint Linus.
Pope and Martyr.
Feast Day 23 September.

Semi-Double.

Red Vestments.

"At Rome," says the Roman Martyrology, "the triumph of Saint Linus, Pope and Martyr, who immediately succeeded Saint Peter in the government of the Church. He suffered Martyrdom, and was buried on the Vatican Hill, next to the Prince of the Apostles."

The name of Saint Linus is mentioned in the Canon of the Mass, after the names of the Apostles.

Mass: Státuit, and Collects of the Mass: Sacerdótes.

Commemoration of Saint Thecla.

St Andrew Daily Missal (Traditional Mass)

Available (in U.K.) from

Available (in U.S.A.) from



Weekly Traditional Latin Masses In Kent. Maidstone, Ashford, Tenterden, Headcorn.


The current hiatus at Blackfen, Kent, England, where the new Parish Priest has banned the Celebration of Traditional Latin Masses, on the grounds that "they are DIVISIVE", encourages Zephyrinus to publicise the Traditional Latin Masses which
ARE CELEBRATED in Kent on a REGULAR WEEKLY BASIS ON SUNDAYS.

In addition, Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated during the Week,
on Feast Days and Holy Days of Obligation.

There is a vibrant and happy group who attend these Masses and meet, after Mass,
for a lovely Lunch in various hostelries and locations.

Do come and join them. You will all be most welcome.

Besides Glorifying God in an edifying, Holy and Traditional manner,
you will see the wonderful Kent countryside changing throughout the Seasons,
which, in itself, Glorifies God.



              




MAIDSTONE, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT FRANCIS.


Photo: © Copyright Chris Whippet
and licensed for reuse under this

Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Francis,
126, Week Street, Maidstone, Kent ME14 1RH,
(next to Maidstone East Railway Station)
at 1200 hrs,
on the FIRST SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




ASHFORD, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT SIMON  STOCK.


Photo: WIKIMAPIA

  Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Simon Stock,
Brookfield Road, Ashford, Kent TN23 4EU,
at 1200 hrs,
on the SECOND SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




TENTERDEN, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT ANDREW.



Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Andrew,
47, Ashford Road, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6LL,
at 1200 hrs,
on the THIRD SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




HEADCORN, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT THOMAS OF CANTERBURY.


Photo © Copyright David Anstiss
and licensed for reuse

Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury,
Becket Court, 15, Station Road, Headcorn, Kent TN27 9SB,
(next to Headcorn Railway Station)
at 1200 hrs,
on the FOURTH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




WHEN THERE IS A FIFTH SUNDAY IN THE MONTH,
THE TRADITIONAL LATIN MASS IS CELEBRATED AT

ASHFORD, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT SIMON  STOCK.


Photo: WIKIMAPIA

  Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Simon Stock,
Brookfield Road, Ashford, Kent TN23 4EU,
at 1200 hrs,
on the FIFTH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




Honk Against Satan !!!



This Article can be found in full at TFP STUDENT ACTION

UPDATE ON THE RALLY OF REPARATION
AGAINST THE SATANIC BLACK MASS IN OKLAHOMA.

You'll want to see this video about the rally of reparation held in Oklahoma City against the satanic black mass



Here's the video for you:
And since you've been praying and protesting this outrageous sacrilege, I wanted you to be among the first to receive this short video and update from Oklahoma.
So much happened yesterday:
At 3:00, TFP volunteers joined thousands of fellow Catholics for a Holy Hour, procession and Benediction lead by Archbishop Coakley at St. Francis Church. The Church was jam packed and the overflow crowd spilled out into the street.
Later in the day, right in front of the Civic Center -- where the Black Mass was perpetrated -- the American TFP held a peaceful and prayerful rally of reparation against this grave offense against God.
Faithful from across the country arrived to console Our Lord and the Blessed Mother.
Multiple buses rolled in from Kansas.
A team of nineteen TFP Student Action volunteers drove down from Pennsylvania (1,291 miles one way). We were blessed to be able to stand up for Holy Mother Church, the true Mass, and the Holy Eucharist -- praying the rosary, holding signs and displaying banners outside the Civic Center.
Evil has never been so brazen.
God has never been so reviled in a public venue, with the complicity of city officials who refused to cancel the black mass. Never has the spiritual battle between good and evil been so apparent.
That's why you and I must continue to watch and pray.
Moreover, we must not grow tired of fighting the good fight. With Saint Michael Archangel, who won the most decisive battle in Heaven against Lucifer, we proclaim: Quis ut Deus! Who is like unto God.
Evil is eternally vanquished.
Thank you for everything you did to oppose the black mass. Your efforts and prayers are never overlooked by God.
May He reward you a hundred fold and truly transform America into one nation under God.
Keep fighting the good fight,









 
 
John Ritchie
John Ritchie
Tradition Family Property, Student Action
www.tfpstudentaction.org
 
 
P.S. -- Placing all our trust in God and the Blessed Mother, me and my TFP Student Action colleagues are putting in long hours to build a national movement against the Black Mass.
We're even burning the candle at both ends, but there's only so much we can do by ourselves. We need YOU. That's why I'm counting on your prayers and swift action to share this alert with lots of people. To reach 100,000 petitions before it's too late.
Thank you for everything. 

Wells Cathedral (Part Four).


Text and Illustrations from Wikipedia - the free encyclopaedia,
unless otherwise stated.




Fan-Vaulting in
Wells Cathedral.
Image: SHUTTERSTOCK




The West Front,
Wells Cathedral,
Somerset, England.
Photo: 30 April 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0
(Wikimedia Commons)



About 1310, work commenced on The Lady Chapel, to the design of Thomas Witney, who also built the Central Tower, from 1315 to 1322, in the Decorated Gothic Style. The Tower was later braced internally with Arches by William Joy. Concurrent with this work, in 1329–1345, Joy made alterations and extensions to the Choir, joining it to The Lady Chapel with the Retro-Choir, the latter in the Flowing Decorated Style.



English: Wells Cathedral's Great West Front
Photo: 27 October 2010.
Source: Own work.
Author: Ad Meskens.
(Wikimedia Commons)



Later changes include the Perpendicular Style Vault of the Tower and construction of Sugar's Chapel, 1475–1490, by William Smyth. Also, Gothic Revival Renovations were made to the Choir and Pulpitum, by Benjamin Ferrey and Anthony Salvin, in 1842–1857.

Wells Cathedral has a total length of 415 feet (126 m). In common with Canterbury, Lincoln and Salisbury Cathedrals, it has the distinctly English arrangement of two Transepts, with the body of the Church divided into distinct parts: Nave, Choir, and Retro-Choir, beyond which extends The Lady Chapel.



The Stairs leading from the North Transept
of Wells Cathedral to the Chapter House.
Photo: 9 July 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0
(Wikimedia Commons)



The façade is wide, with its Towers extending beyond the Transepts on either side. There is a large projecting Porch on the North Side of the Nave, forming an entry into the Cathedral. To the North-East, is the large Octagonal Chapter House, entered from the North Choir Aisle by a Passage and Staircase. To the South of the Nave, is a large Cloister, unusual, in that the Northern Range, that adjacent the Cathedral, was never built.

In Section, the Cathedral has the usual arrangement of a large Church: A Central Nave, with an Aisle on each side, separated by two Arcades. The Elevation is in three stages, Arcade; Triforium Gallery; and Clerestory.



Wells Cathedral's North Transept,
with its Mediaeval Clock Face,
the North Porch,
and the North-West Tower.
Photo: 26 June 2009.
Source: Own work.
Author: Olaf Tausch.
(Wikimedia Commons)



The Nave is 67 feet (20 m) in height, very low compared to the Gothic Cathedrals of France. It has a markedly horizontal emphasis, caused by the Triforium having a unique form, a series of identical narrow openings, lacking the usual definition of the Bays. The Triforium is separated from the Arcade by a single horizontal String Course, that runs unbroken the length of the Nave. There are no vertical lines linking the three stages, as the Shafts, supporting the Vault, rise above the Triforium.

The Exterior of Wells Cathedral presents a relatively tidy and harmonious appearance, since the greater part of the building was executed in a single style, Early-English Gothic. This is uncommon among English Cathedrals, where the Exterior usually exhibits a plethora of styles.



The Organ,
Wells Cathedral.
Photo: 9 July 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.
(Wikimedia Commons)



At Wells Cathedral, later changes in the Perpendicular Style were universally applied, such as filling the Early-English Lancet Windows with simple Tracery, the construction of a Parapet that encircles the roof, and the addition of Pinnacles, framing each Gable, similar to those around the Chapter House and on the West Front. At the Eastern End, there is a proliferation of Tracery, with repeated motifs in the Reticulated Style, a stage between Geometric and Flowing Decorated Tracery.

The West Front is 100 feet (30 m) high and 147 feet (45 m) wide, and is built of Inferior Oolite of the Middle Jurassic period, which came from the Doulting Stone Quarry, about 8 miles (13 km) to the East. According to the architectural historian, Alec Clifton-Taylor, it is "one of the great sights of England".



English: A Gallery of Royalty fills the Niches
of the North-West Buttresses
of Wells Cathedral,
with Clerics on the South-West Buttresses.
Nederlands: Beelden aan de muur van Wells Cathedral.
Photo: 27 October 2010.
Source: Own work.
Author: Ad Meskens.
(Wikimedia Commons)



West Fronts, in general, take three distinct forms: Those that follow the Elevation of the Nave and Aisles; those that have Paired Towers at the end of each Aisle, framing the Nave; and those that screen the form of the building. The West Front at Wells has the Paired-Tower form, unusual in that the Towers do not indicate the location of the Aisles, but extend well beyond them, screening the dimensions and profile of the building.


PART FIVE FOLLOWS


Monday, 22 September 2014

Weekly Traditional Latin Masses In Kent. Maidstone, Ashford, Tenterden, Headcorn.


The current hiatus at Blackfen, Kent, England, where the new Parish Priest has banned the Celebration of Traditional Latin Masses, on the grounds that "they are DIVISIVE", encourages Zephyrinus to publicise the Traditional Latin Masses which
ARE CELEBRATED in Kent on a REGULAR WEEKLY BASIS ON SUNDAYS.

In addition, Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated during the Week,
on Feast Days and Holy Days of Obligation.

There is a vibrant and happy group who attend these Masses and meet, after Mass,
for a lovely Lunch in various hostelries and locations.

Do come and join them. You will all be most welcome.

Besides Glorifying God in an edifying, Holy and Traditional manner,
you will see the wonderful Kent countryside changing throughout the Seasons,
which, in itself, Glorifies God.



              




MAIDSTONE, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT FRANCIS.


Photo: © Copyright Chris Whippet
and licensed for reuse under this

Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Francis,
126, Week Street, Maidstone, Kent ME14 1RH,
(next to Maidstone East Railway Station)
at 1200 hrs,
on the FIRST SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




ASHFORD, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT SIMON  STOCK.


Photo: WIKIMAPIA

  Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Simon Stock,
Brookfield Road, Ashford, Kent TN23 4EU,
at 1200 hrs,
on the SECOND SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




TENTERDEN, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT ANDREW.



Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Andrew,
47, Ashford Road, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6LL,
at 1200 hrs,
on the THIRD SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




HEADCORN, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT THOMAS OF CANTERBURY.


Photo © Copyright David Anstiss
and licensed for reuse

Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury,
Becket Court, 15, Station Road, Headcorn, Kent TN27 9SB,
(next to Headcorn Railway Station)
at 1200 hrs,
on the FOURTH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




WHEN THERE IS A FIFTH SUNDAY IN THE MONTH,
THE TRADITIONAL LATIN MASS IS CELEBRATED AT

ASHFORD, KENT.

CHURCH OF SAINT SIMON  STOCK.


Photo: WIKIMAPIA

  Traditional Latin Masses are Celebrated at the
Church of Saint Simon Stock,
Brookfield Road, Ashford, Kent TN23 4EU,
at 1200 hrs,
on the FIFTH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH.




"In The End, My Immaculate Heart Will Triumph . . ." Our Lady Of Fatima, 1917.






"In the end, my Immaculate Heart will triumph . . ."

Our Lady of Fatima, 1917.


Wells Cathedral (Part Three).


Text and Illustrations from Wikipedia - the free encyclopaedia,
unless otherwise stated.



Fan-Vaulting in
Wells Cathedral.
Image: SHUTTERSTOCK



The West Front,
Wells Cathedral,
Somerset, England.
Photo: 30 April 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0
(Wikimedia Commons)


Following Creighton's appointment as Bishop, Ralph Bathurst, who had been Chaplain to the King, President of Trinity College, Oxford, and Fellow of the Royal Society, became Dean. During Bathurst's long tenure, the Cathedral was restored, however, in the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, Puritan soldiers damaged the West Front, tore Lead from the roof to make bullets, broke the windows, smashed the Organ and furnishings, and, for a time, stabled their horses in the Nave.

Restoration began again under Bishop Thomas Ken, who was appointed by the Crown in 1685 and served until 1691. He was one of seven Bishops imprisoned for refusing to sign King James II's "Declaration of Indulgence", which would have enabled Catholics to resume positions of political power, but popular support led to their acquittal. Ken refused to take the Oath of Allegiance to William and Mary, because James II had not Abdicated and, with others, known as the Nonjurors, was put out of Office. His successor, Bishop Kidder, was killed in the Great Storm of 1703, when two Chimney Stacks on the Palace fell on him and his wife, while they were asleep in bed.



The 13th-Century West Front, Wells Cathedral, by Thomas Norreys.
As a synthesis of form, architectural decoration and figurative sculpture,
it is considered to be unsurpassed in Britain.
Photo: 27 October 2010.
Source: Wikimedia Commons
Author: Ad Meskens.
(Wikimedia Commons)


By the middle of the 19th-Century, a major restoration programme was needed. Under Dean Goodenough, the Monuments were moved to the Cloisters and the remaining Mediaeval paint and whitewash was removed in an operation known as "The Great Scrape".

Anthony Salvin took charge of the extensive restoration of the Choir. Wooden Galleries, that had been installed in the 16th-Century, were removed and the Stalls were given Stone Canopies and placed further back within the line of the Arcade. The Mediaeval Stone Pulpitum Screen was extended in the centre to support a new Organ.

The Late-20th-Century saw an extensive restoration programme, particularly of the West Front. The Stained-Glass is currently under restoration, with a programme underway to conserve the large 14th-Century Jesse Tree Window, at the Eastern Terminal of the Choir.



On the lowest levels, many statues are lost,
but this group of Saints remains
at the back of the North Tower.
Photo: 9 December 2008.
Source: Own work.
Author: Mattana.
(Wikimedia Commons)


Since the 13th-Century, Wells Cathedral has been the Seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells. Its Governing Body, the Chapter, is made up of five Clerical Canons (the Dean, the Precentor, the Canon Chancellor, the Canon Treasurer, and the Arch-Deacon of Wells) and four Lay Members: The Administrator (Chief Executive), Keeper of the Fabric, Overseer of the Estate and the Chairman of the Cathedral Shop and Catering Boards. The current Bishop of Bath and Wells is Peter Hancock, who was installed in a Service in the Cathedral on 7 June 2014. The present Dean is John Clarke.

Employed Staff include the Organist and Master of Choristers, Head Verger, Archivist, Librarian and the Staff of the Shop, Café and Restaurant. The Chapter is advised by specialists, such as Architects, Archaeologists and Financial Experts.

More than a thousand Services are held each year. There are Daily Services of Matins, Holy Communion and Choral Evensong, as well as major celebrations of Christian Festivals, such as Christmas, Easter, Pentecost and Saints' Days.

The Cathedral is also used for the Baptisms, Weddings and Funerals of those with close connections to it. In July 2009, the Cathedral hosted the Funeral of Harry Patch, the last British Army Veteran of World War I, who died at the age of 111.


This is a fully-dressed Traditional Verger's Gown.
Note the Velvet Trimming down the front,
and Velvet Chevrons on the Sleeves. The Verger has a White Jabot at the throat.
Source: www.vgdd.org, [The Vergers' Guild Of The Diocese Of Dallas],
which is my site and contains my photographs
and which are available to anyone who wants them.
This File: 25 January 2006.
User: Sarum blue.
(Wikipedia)

Three Sunday Services are led by the resident Choir (during the School Terms) and Choral Services are sung on weekdays. The Cathedral hosts visiting Choirs and is involved in outreach work with local schools, as part of its Chorister Outreach Project. The Cathedral is also the venue for musical events, such as an Annual Concert by the Somerset Chamber Choir.

Each year, approximately 150,000 people attend Services, and another 300,000 visit as tourists. Entry is free, but visitors are encouraged to make a donation towards the annual running costs, which were around £2 million (approx. US$3.3 million) in 2010.

Construction of the Cathedral began about 1175, to the design of an unknown architect. Wells is the first Cathedral in England to be, from its Foundation, built in the Gothic Style. According to art historian John Harvey, it is the first truly Gothic Cathedral in the world, its architects having entirely dispensed with all the features that bound the contemporary East End of Canterbury Cathedral and the earlier buildings of France, such as the East End of the Abbey of Saint Denis, to the Romanesque.

Unlike these Churches, Wells has Clustered Piers, rather than Columns, and has a Gallery of identical Pointed Arches, rather than the typically-Romanesque form of Paired Openings. The Style, with its simple Non-Traceried Lancet Arches and Convoluted Mouldings, is known as Early-English Gothic.



Wells Cathedral's Central Tower,
seen from the Cloisters.
Photo: 27 October 2010.
Source: Own work.
Author: Ad Meskens.
(Wikimedia Commons)


From about 1192 to 1230, Adam Lock, the earliest Architect at Wells for whom a name is known, continued the Transept and Nave in the same manner as his predecessor. Lock was also Builder of the North Porch, to his own design.

The Early-English West Front was commenced around 1230, by Thomas Norreys, with building and sculpture continuing for thirty years. Its South-West Tower was begun 100 years later and constructed between 1365 and 1395, and the North-West Tower between 1425 and 1435, both in the Perpendicular Gothic Style, to the design of William Wynford, who also filled many of the Cathedral's Early-English Lancet Windows with delicate Tracery.



The Chapter House,
Wells Cathedral.
Photo: 9 July 2014.
Source: Own work.
Author: Diliff.
Photo by DAVID ILIFF.
License: CC-BY-SA 3.0
(Wikimedia Commons)


Between 1275 and 1310, the Undercroft and Chapter House were built by unknown architects, the Undercroft in the Early-English Style and the Chapter House in the Geometric Style of Decorated Gothic.


PART FOUR FOLLOWS
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