Saint Paul-Without-The-Walls, Rome. Author: Herbert Weber, Hildesheim. Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Wikimedia Commons.

04 December 2021

Saint Barbara. Virgin And Martyr. Feast Day, Today, 4 December.


Text from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal,
unless stated otherwise.

Saint Barbara.
   Virgin And Martyr.
   Feast Day 4 December.

Simple.

Red Vestments.


Saint Barbara Altarpiece.
Artist: Wilhelm Kalteysen (1420–1496).
Date: 1447.
Note: Painted for Saint Barbara's Church, Wrocław, Poland
(today an Orthodox Church).
Initially a Polyptych. The Wings were lost during World War II.
Source/Photographer: GOOGLE ARTS AND CULTURE
(Wikimedia Commons)

Saint Barbara died in Asia Minor about 235 A.D. She is included in "The Fourteen Auxiliary Saints".

Mass: Loquébar.


Pictures of Front and Back of Order of Saint Barbara Medallion,
Patron Saint of Artillerymen.
Photo: 29 December 2007.
Source: Own work.
(Wikimedia Commons)


Saint Barbara.
Available on YouTube at

The following Text is from Wikipedia - the free encyclopædia.

Saint Barbara (Greek: Αγία Βαρβάρα, Coptic: Ϯⲁⲅⲓⲁ Ⲃⲁⲣⲃⲁⲣⲁ), whose Feast Day is 4 December, known in The Eastern Orthodox Church as The Great Martyr Barbara, was an Early-Christian Greek Saint and Martyr. Accounts place her in the 3rd-Century A.D. in Heliopolis, Syria, present-day Baalbek, Lebanon.

There is no reference to her in the authentic Early-Christian writings, nor in the original Recension of Saint Jerome's Martyrology. Her name can be traced to the 7th-Century A.D., and Veneration of her was common, especially in The East, from the 9th-Century A.D.

Because of doubts about the historicity of her legend, she was removed from The General Roman Calendar in The 1969 Revision, though not from The Catholic Church's List of Saints.

Saint Barbara is often portrayed with miniature Chains and a Tower. As one of The Fourteen Holy Helpers, Barbara continues to be a popular Saint in modern times, perhaps best known as The Patron Saint of Armourers, Artillerymen, Military Engineers, Miners, and others who work with Explosives, because of her old legend's association with Lightning, and also of Mathematicians.

Many of the thirteen Miracles in a 15th-Century French version of her story turn on the security she offered, that her devotees would not die without making Confession and receiving Extreme Unction.

Saint Peter Chrysologus. Bishop. Confessor. Doctor Of The Church. Feast Day 4 December.


Text from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal,
unless stated otherwise.

Saint Peter Chrysologus.
   Bishop.
   Confessor.
   Doctor Of The Church.
   Feast Day 4 December.

Double.

White Vestments.


Saint Peter Chrysologus.
Artist: School of Guercino.
Date: 17th-Century.
Source/Photographer: it.wikipedia.org
Collection: Diocesan Museum Blessed Pope Pius IX, Imola, Italy.
(Wikimedia Commons)


Saint Peter Chrysologus gained the name Chrysologus, which means "Speech of Gold", by his great eloquence. As The Collect reminds us, his promotion to The See of Ravenna (433 A.D.), owing to an apparition of the Apostle Saint Peter to Pope Sixtus III, was miraculous.

"You are The Salt of The Earth . . . and The Light of The World," says the Gospel. "Preach The Word; be instant in Season, out of Season; reprove, entreat, rebuke . . . do the work of an Evangelist," continues the Epistle.

That was what Saint Peter Chrysologus did: He composed more than one hundred and sixty Homilies, full of learning, which earned him the Title of Doctor of The Church.

It was he who wrote this well-known saying: "He who amuses himself with Satan cannot rejoice with Christ."

He died at Imola in 450 A.D.

Let us listen lovingly to The Word of God.

Mass: In médio.
Commemoration: Of The Feria.
Commemoration: Of Saint Barbara.


The following Text is form Wikipedia - the free encyclopædia.

Peter Chrysologus (Greek: Ἅγιος Πέτρος ὁ Χρυσολόγος, Petros Chrysologos, meaning Peter The "Golden-Worded") (circa 380 A.D. – circa 450 A.D.), was Bishop of Ravenna from about 433 A.D. until his death. He is known as "The Doctor of Homilies” for the concise, but theologically rich, reflections that he delivered during his time as The Bishop of Ravenna.

He is revered as a Saint by The Roman Catholic Church and The Eastern Orthodox Church; he was declared a Doctor of The Church by Pope Benedict XIII in 1729.

03 December 2021

Saint Francis Xavier. Confessor. Whose Feast Day Is, Today, 3 December.


Text from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal,
unless stated otherwise.

Saint Francis Xavier.
   Confessor.
   Feast Day 3 December.

Greater-Double.

White Vestments.


Statue of Saint Francis Xavier,
Saint Francis Xavier Catholic Church,
Superior, Wisconsin, United States of America.
Photo: 20 April 2015.
Source: Own work.
Author: Billertl
(Wikimedia Commons)

Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), was touched, after a long resistance, by the words constantly repeated to him by Saint Ignatius Loyola: "What does it profit a man if he gains the whole World, and suffers the loss of his own Soul ?" He then became one of Saint Ignatius' most zealous fellow-workers in the newly-formed Society of Jesus (The Jesuits).

"Go ye into the whole World, and Preach the Gospel to every creature," says the Gospel. "Their sound hath gone forth into all the Earth, and their words unto the ends of the whole World," adds the Epistle.

This was the programme of the whole life of Saint Francis Xavier," whose Preaching and Miracles added to The Church the Nations of The Indies" (Collect). He Preached the Gospel there, and in Japan, to more than fifty Kingdoms, and converted innumerable pagans.

Let us share in the Apostolic zeal of this Saint, who has earned the glorious Title of Patron of The Propagation of The Faith; and let us help this work with our Prayers and our Alms.

Mass: Loquébar.
Commemoration: Of The Feria.


Saint Francis Xavier.
The Patron Saint of Missionaries.
Available on YouTube at

The following Text is from Wikipedia - the free encyclopædia.

Saint Francis Xavier, S.J. (who was born Francisco de Jasso y Azpilicueta,
7 April 1506 - 3 December 1552), was a Navarrese-Basque Roman Catholic Missionary, born in Javier (Xavier in Navarro-Aragonese or Xabier in Basque), Kingdom of Navarre (now part of Spain), and a co-founder of The Society of Jesus. He was a companion of Saint Ignatius of Loyola and one of the first seven Jesuits who took vows of Poverty and Chastity at Montmartre, Paris in 1534.

He led an extensive Mission into Asia, mainly in The Portuguese Empire of the time, and was influential in Evangelisation work, most notably in India. He also was the first Christian Missionary to venture into Japan, Borneo, The Maluku Islands, and other areas. In those areas, struggling to learn the local languages and in the face of opposition, he had less success than he had enjoyed in India. Xavier was about to extend his Missionary Preaching to China, but died in Shangchuan Island shortly before he could do so.


Saint Francis Xavier Catholic Church,
Superior, Wisconsin, United States of America.

He was Beatified by Pope Saint Paul V on 25 October 1619 and was Canonised by Pope Gregory XV on 12 March 1622. In 1624, he was made Co-Patron of Navarre, Spain. Known as "The Apostle of The Indies," and "The Apostle of Japan", he is considered to be one of the greatest Missionaries since Saint Paul.

In 1927, Pope Pius XI published the Decree "Apostolicorum in Missionibus", naming Saint Francis Xavier, along with Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, Co-Patron of all Foreign Missions. He is now Co-Patron Saint of Navarre, Spain, with San Fermin. The Day of Navarre (Día de Navarra) marks the Anniversary of Saint Francis Xavier's death, on 3 December 1552.

02 December 2021

Basilique Notre-Dame De Fourvière, Lyon, France. “The Upside-Down Elephant”.



Basilica of Notre-Dame de Fourvière,
Lyon, France. 


The following Text is from Wikipedia - the free encyclopædia,
unless stated otherwise.

The Basilica of Notre-Dame de Fourvière (French: Basilique Notre-Dame de Fourvière) is a Minor Basilica in Lyon, France. It was built with private funds between 1872 and 1896 in a dominant position overlooking the City. The site it occupies was once the Roman Forum of Trajan, (Latin: “Forum Vetus”) (Old Forum), thus its name (as an inverted corruption of the French Vieux-Forum).

Fourvière is dedicated to The Virgin Mary, to whom is attributed the salvation of the City of Lyon from The Bubonic Plague that swept Europe in 1643.[1]

Each year in early December (8 December, Feast Day of The Immaculate Conception), Lyon thanks The Blessed Virgin for saving the City, by lighting candles throughout the City, in what is called the Fête des Lumières, or, The Festival of Lights.[2]



Basilique Notre-Dame De Fourvière, Lyon, France.
“The Upside-Down Elephant”.
Available on YouTube at

The Virgin is also credited with saving the City a number of other times, such as from a Cholera epidemic in 1832, and from Prussian invasion in 1870.[1]

During The Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871), Prussian forces, having taken Paris, were progressing South towards Lyon. Their halt and retreat were, once again, attributed by The Church to the Intercession of The Virgin Mary.

Speculating on the reasons for the construction of such an elaborate and expensive building, one author makes the statement that: "The reaction to the communes of Paris and Lyon were triumphalist monuments, The Sacré-Coeur of Montmartre and The Basilica of Fourvière, dominating both Cities. These buildings were erected with private funds, as gigantic “Ex-Votos”, to thank God for victory over the Socialists and in expiation of the sins of modern France."[3]


Perched on top of the Fourvière hill, the Basilica looms impressively over the City of Lyon, from where it can be seen from many vantage points; not unintentionally, the Basilica of Fourvière has become a symbol of the City.

The Basilica, which offers guided tours and contains a Museum of Sacred Art, receives two million visitors annually.[2] At certain times, members of the public may access the Basilica's North Tower for a spectacular 180-degree view of Lyon and its suburbs. On a clear day, Mont Blanc, the highest point in Europe, can be seen in the distance.[2]

The design of the Basilica, by Pierre Bossan, draws from both Romanesque and Byzantine Architecture, two non-Gothic models that were unusual choices at the time. It has four main Towers, and a Bell-Tower topped with a gilded statue of The Virgin Mary. It features fine Mosaics, superb Stained-Glass Windows,[4] and a Crypt of Saint Joseph.


Fourvière actually contains two Churches, one on top of the other. The Upper Sanctuary is very ornate, while the Lower Sanctuary is a much simpler design. Work on the triumphant Basilica was begun in 1872 and finished in 1884. Finishing touches in the Interior were not completed until as late as 1964.

Bossan's first sketches for the Basilica seem to date from 1846. At the time he was in Palermo, Sicily.[5]

The Basilica has acquired the local nickname of "The Upside-Down Elephant", because the building looks like the body of an Elephant and the four Towers look like its legs.[6]

Les Petits Chanteurs de Saint-Marc, The Children's Choir of Saint Mark, is the official Choir of the Basilica. This Choir became well-known after the release of the film, Les Choristes. The Choir's Director is Monsieur Nicolas Porte.


Since 1982, the Tower has housed the Antennæ of Radio Fourvière, the predecessor of Radios Chrétiennes Francophones.

Fourvière has always been a popular place of Pilgrimage. There has been a Shrine at Fourvière, dedicated to Our Lady, since 1170. The Chapel and parts of the building have been rebuilt at different times over the Centuries, the most recent major works being in 1852 when the former Steeple was replaced by a Tower, surmounted by a Golden Statue of The Virgin Mary, sculpted by Joseph-Hugues Fabisch (1812–1886).[6]

On 23 July 1816, twelve Marist aspirants, Priests and Seminarians, climbed the hill to The Shrine of Our Lady of Fourvière, and placed their promise to Found The Society of Mary (Marists), under the Corporal on The Altar, while Fr. Jean-Claude Courveille, the first Superior-General of The Marists, Celebrated Mass.[7]


On 30 September 1821, Fr. André Coindre and ten others made Private Vows in the Chapel there, thus Founding The Fratres a Sacratissimo Corde Iesu (The Brothers of The Sacred Heart), a Roman Catholic Religious Community, primarily devoted to the education of the young.[8]

On 21 January 1851, Fr. Peter Julian Eymard Prayed at The Shrine of Our Lady of Fourvière and was inspired to Found The Congregation of The Blessed Sacrament.[9]

When the City of Lyon was spared in The Franco-Prussian War (1870), the community committed to build the present Basilica alongside the ancient Chapel.[6]

Saint Bibiana. Virgin And Martyr. Feast Day, Today, 2 December.


Text from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal,
unless stated otherwise.

Saint Bibiana.
   Virgin And Martyr.
   Feast Day 2 December.

Semi-Double.

Red Vestments.


Saint Bibiana,
by Gian Lorenzo Bernini.
Church of Santa Bibiana, Rome.
Photo: 30 August 2013.
Source: WikiPaintings
Author: WikiPaintings
(Wikimedia Commons)

Saint Bibiana was born in Rome of a noble Christian family; and, as the Collect tells us, in her the Flower of Virginity was united with the Palm of Martyrdom.

A wise and prudent Virgin (Gradual), she was less afraid of the loss of all her goods and of her sufferings of imprisonment, than of the loss of that Hidden Treasure or that Pearl of Great Price, of which the Gospel speaks.

When delivered to the caresses and flattery off her jailer, Rufinus, who strove to pervert her, she called upon The Lord, Who saved her from destruction (Epistle).

Rufinus then had recourse to violence, but with no greater success. Seeing which, the enraged Governor of Rome ordered that Bibiana should be tied to a Column, and beaten to death with thongs loaded with lead (363 A.D.) The Basilica of Saint Mary Major was built over her tomb.

Mass: Me exspectavérunt, of The Common of Virgins.


Church of Saint Bibiana, Rome.
Illustration: WINE TRIPPING

01 December 2021

The Foundling Museum. Would You Like To Help Children ?



This Article first appeared in December 2020.

Museum News.

1 December 2020.


Welcome back to the Museum

The Covid Letters exhibition is extended until Sunday 11 April 2021.

We are delighted to be able to welcome back visitors to the Museum this December to enjoy The Covid Letters. The exhibition's new closing date of 11 April 2021 will give more visitors the opportunity to view over 200 posters made by young people expressing their lockdown feelings.

Find out more


Online | 36th Annual Conference on Music in 18th-Century Britain.

Catch up with presentations from this year's annual conference from the comfort of your own home.

Enjoy a special YouTube playlist of talks on music in eighteenth-century Britain, including subjects such as small flutes in English music and charitable benefits.

Watch now


Visitor Safety l Plan ahead.

With the reopening of the Museum on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, we'd like to assure the public that we're adhering to the highest levels of precautions to keep all of our visitors, volunteers and staff safe. To find out what we're doing, visit our website to learn about our procedures and facilities.

Find out more



Shopping | Portraying Pregnancy.

Looking for Christmas present ideas ? 

Portraying Pregnancy, the book written by curator Karen Hearn to accompany our exhibition, is still available to buy. If you're unable to visit the Museum shop, email your name and number to enquiries@foundlingmuseum.org.uk, and someone will get back to you to arrange p & p.


Online | Zoom Backgrounds.

Liven up your video calls with our Zoom backgrounds and bring the Foundling Museum into your own home. View the images, which we've made available to download and learn some fun facts about each of them.

See our selection


From Our Friends | Italian Threads: MITA Textile Design 1926-1976

Until 3 April 2021 | Estorick Collection.

Founded in Genoa in 1926, MITA (Manifattura Italiana Tappeti Artistici) was a celebrated Italian textile firm that earned its reputation by collaborating with some of Italy’s most talented artists and designers. This exhibition reveals the company’s characteristically Italian approach to design.

Find out more


From Our Friends | The Postal Museum Re-opening.

From 5 December | The Postal Museum.

The Postal Museum are re-opening their doors on Saturday 5 December 2020. Enjoy Mail Rail Christmas Ride and other festivities for all the family, and don't miss the last chance to see The Great Train Robbery exhibition.

Find out more


From Our Friends | Dub London: Bassline of a City.

Until 31 January 2021 | Museum of London.

From its roots in Jamaican reggae to how it shaped communities over the last 50 years, the Museum of London’s exciting new display celebrates dub music and its influence on the capital. Entry included with a free museum ticket.

Image credit: ‘A man standing in front of a bank of loud speakers in All Saints Road, Notting Hill, during the Notting Hill Carnival, 21st August 1994’ © Peter Marshall

FIND OUT MORE.

Where artists and children have inspired each other since 1740.

The Foundling Museum,
40 Brunswick Square,
London WC1N 1AZ.
T: +44(0)20 7841 3600.

If you have been Forwarded this E-Mail,
and would like to hear from us in future,

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum. The Sacred Heart Of Jesus.



English: True Bodily and Spiritual Enlightenment of The Sacred Heart of Jesus.
Picture, dated to 1630, in The Church of Saint-Gervais-et-Saint-Protais, Paris.
Français: Photographie d'un des panneaux de la chapelle dorée
de l'église Saint Gervais-Saint Protais à Paris, représentant
le coeur rayonnant de Jésus Christ, peint vers 1630.
Photo: 16 September 2017.
Source: Own work.
Author: Châtillon
(Wikimedia Commons)



Cor Iesu Sacratissimum adveniat regnum tuum.
Available on YouTube at


The following Text is from Wikipedia - the free encyclopædia,
unless stated otherwise.

The Sacred Heart, also known as The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus (Latin: Sacratissimum Cor Iesu), is one of the most-widely-practised and well-known Catholic devotions, wherein The Heart of Jesus is viewed as a symbol of "God's boundless and passionate love for mankind".[1]

This devotion to Christ is predominantly used in The Catholic Church, followed by High-Church Anglicans, Lutherans and some Western Rite Orthodox. In The Latin Church, the Liturgical Solemnity of The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus is Celebrated on The Third Friday After Pentecost.[2] The Twelve promises of The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus are also extremely popular.


The devotion is especially concerned with what The Catholic Church deems to be the long-suffering love and compassion of The Heart of Christ towards humanity.

The popularisation of this devotion in its modern form is derived from a Roman Catholic Nun from France, Margaret Mary Alacoque, who said she learned the devotion from Jesus during a series of apparitions to her between 1673 and 1675,[3] and, later, in the 19th-Century, from the mystical revelations of another Catholic Nun in Portugal, Mary of The Divine Heart, a Religious Sister of The Congregation of The Good Shepherd, who requested in the name of Christ that Pope Leo XIII Consecrate the entire World to The Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Predecessors to the modern devotion arose unmistakably in The Middle Ages in various facets of Catholic Mysticism, particularly with Saint Gertrude the Great.[4]


Catholic Holy Card depicting The Sacred Heart of Jesus.
Date: Circa 1880.
Auguste Martin Collection, University of Dayton Libraries.
Source: Own work.
Author: Turgis
(Wikimedia Commons)


Cor Iesu Sacratissimum adveniat regnum tuum.
Available on YouTube at

The First Day Of December.


The following Text is from “The Liturgical Year”,
by Abbot Guéranger, O.S.B.

Volume 1.
   Advent.


Salisbury Cathedral.
Illustration: PINTEREST

The Church of Rome does not keep this day as a Feast Day of any Saint; she simply recites The Office of The Feria, unless it happens that The First Sunday of Advent falls on this first day of the month, in which case The Office of that Sunday is Celebrated.

But, should this first day of December be a simple Feria of Advent, we shall do well to begin at once our considerations upon the preparations which were made for the merciful coming of The Saviour of the World.

Four thousand years of expectation preceded that coming, and they are expressed by the four weeks of Advent, which we must spend before we come to the glorious festivity of Our Lord’s Nativity.


Durham Cathedral.
Illustration: PINTEREST

Let us reflect upon the holy impatience of The Saints of The Old Testament, and how they handed down, from age to age, the grand hope, which was to be but hope to them, since they were not to see it realised. Let us follow, in thought, the long succession of the witnesses of the promise: Adam, and the first Patriarchs, who lived before The Deluge; then, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and The Twelve Patriarchs of The Hebrew People; then Moses, Samuel, David, and Solomon; then, The Prophets and The Machabees; and, at last, John the Baptist and his disciples.


Saint Fin Barre Cathedral,
Cork, Ireland.
Illustration: REDDIT

These are the holy ancestors of whom The Book of Ecclesiasticus speaks, where it says: “Let us praise men of renown, and our Fathers in their generation”; and of whom The Apostle thus speaks to The Hebrews: “All these being approved by the testimony of Faith, received not the Promise; God providing some better thing for us, that they should not be perfected without us”: Their Faith was tried and approved, and yet they received not the object of The Promises made to them. It is for us that God had reserved the stupendous gift, and, therefore, He did not permit them to attain the object of their desires.

Let us honour them for their Faith; let us honour them as our veritable Fathers, since it is in reward of their Faith, that Our Lord remembered and fulfilled His Merciful Promise; let us honour them, too, as the ancestors of The Messias in the flesh.


Lincoln Cathedral.
Illustration: PINTEREST

We may imagine each of them saying, as he lay on his dying bed, this Solemn Prayer to Him, Who, alone, could conquer death: “I will look for Thy Salvation, Oh, Lord !” It was the exclamation of Jacob, at his last hour, when he was pronouncing his prophetic blessings on his children: “And then,” says The Scripture, “he drew up his feet upon his bed, and died, and he was gathered unto his people.”

Thus, did all these holy men, on quitting this life, go to await, far from the abode of Eternal Light, Him, Who was to come in due time and re-open The Gate of Heaven. Let us contemplate them in this place of expectation, and give our grateful thanks to God, Who has brought us to His Admirable Light, without requiring us to pass through a Limbo of Darkness.


Chichester Cathedral.
Illustration: WEST SUSSEX

It is our duty to Pray ardently for the coming of The Deliverer, Who will break down, by His Cross, The Gates of The Prison, and will fill it with The Brightness of His Glory. During this Holy Season, The Church is continually borrowing the fervent expressions of these Fathers of The Christian People, making them her own Prayer for The Messias to come.


Greek Orthodox Chant.
“Agni Parthene”.
“Αγνή Παρθένε”.
Available on YouTube at

(See the reference to Greek Orthodox Hymn, below).

“Agni Parthene”, rendered “O, Virgin Pure”, is a Greek Marian Hymn composed
by Saint Nectarios of Aegina in the Late-19th-Century, first published in Print in his “Theotokarion”.

In Orthodox Churches, it is considered “Para-Liturgical”, and, therefore, only to be used outside of Liturgical Services. Though it is often performed by some Choirs as a Recessional, after the conclusion of The Divine Liturgy during the Veneration of The Cross and receiving of Anti-Doron.

Performed by: Petros Gaitanos/ Πέτρος Γαϊτάνος.


Ely Cathedral.
Illustration: KATEY JANE PHOTOGRAPHY

Let us turn to those great Saints, and beg of them to Pray, that our work of preparation for Jesus' coming to our hearts may be Blessed by God.

We will make use, for this end, of the beautiful Hymn (“Avorum hodie, fideles”) wherein The Greek Church Celebrates the memory of all The Saints of The Old Testament, on the Sunday immediately preceding The Feast of Christmas.


Lichfield Cathedral.

30 November 2021

Saint Andrew. Apostle. Feast Day 30 November.


Text from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal,
unless otherwise stated.

Saint Andrew.
   Apostle.
   Feast Day 30 November.

Double of The Second-Class.

Red Vestments.


Saint Andrew.
Apostle.
Artist: René de Cramer.
“Copyright Brunelmar/Ghent/Belgium”.
Used with Permission.

The Feast of Saint Andrew has always been kept, since the 4th-Century A.D., on 30 November.

Saint Andrew was an Apostle and a Martyr. The Collect tells us that he was called to govern and teach The Church; and the Epistle and the Gospel deal
with the Vocation of Saint Andrew, who was the first among The Apostles to know Jesus Christ.

When he was called, he immediately left his nets to become a fisher of men (Gospel), and "his sound hath gone forth into all the Earth to Preach the Gospel of Peace" (Epistle). After the coming of The Holy Ghost, he Preached in Palestine, and then in Scythia, Epirus and Thrace.

"But all have not obeyed the Gospel" (Epistle), and Saint Andrew ere long became The Apostle of The Cross. The priests of Achaia describe his Martyrdom at Patras. He died on that special form of Cross which has ever since been called after him, and "The Lord received his Sacrifice in the odour of sweetness" (Alleluia).


His body, having been first taken to Constantinople, was, in 1210, moved to the Cathedral at Amalfi, in the Kingdom of Naples. In 1462, his head was placed by Pope Pius II in the Basilica of Saint Peter, his brother. His name is inscribed in The Canon of The Mass (First List). Saint Andrew is the Patron Saint of Scotland.

Every Parish Priest Celebrates Mass for the people of his Parish.

Let us, with Saint Andrew, follow Christ even to The Cross.

Mass: Mihi autem.
Commemoration: During Advent, a Commemoration of The Feria is made on every Saint's Day by The Collects of the preceding Sunday. (Ember Days have Proper Collects.)
Credo: Is said or sung.
Preface: Of The Apostles.
Second Vespers: On Great Feast Days, or when the next day is not a Feast, Second Vespers are Celebrated in honour of the same Saint as First Vespers.






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29 November 2021

Saint Saturninus. Martyr. Whose Feast Day Is, Today, 29 November.


Text is from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal
unless stated otherwise.

Saint Saturninus.
   Martyr.
   Feast Day 29 November.

Simple.

Red Vestments.


Saint Saturninus was Martyred in Rome, under Emperor Maximian, 300 A.D.

The Roman Martyrology mentions, on the same day, another Saint Saturninus, Bishop, Martyred at Toulouse, under Emperor Decius, about 250 A.D.

Mass: Lætábitur, from The Common of One Martyr (except Proper Collects).

Vigil Of Saint Andrew. Apostle. 29 November.


Text from The Saint Andrew Daily Missal,
unless otherwise stated.

Vigil of Saint Andrew.
   Apostle.
   29 November.

Simple.

Violet Vestments.


Madonna and Child,
Saint Peter, Saint John the Baptist, Saint Joseph, Saint Paul.
Artist: René de Cramer.
"Copyright Brunelmar/Ghent/Belgium".
Used with Permission.

Now begins
“The Sanctoral Cycle”
or
“The Proper of The Saints”.



Saint Andrew.
Apostle.
Artist: René de Cramer.
"Copyright Brunelmar/Ghent/Belgium".
Used with Permission.

The Gospel tells us that it was Saint John the Baptist, who, whilst fulfilling his mission of preparing Souls for the coming of Our Lord, pointed out The Messias to his Disciple, Andrew, The latter immediately went to Jesus and became one of His followers.

If The Feast of Saint Andrew (30 November) falls on a Monday, The Mass of The Vigil is said on the previous Saturday, but the Commemoration of Saint Saturninus is made on the Sunday. The same rule holds good for the other Vigils, with the exception of that of Christmas.

If The Feast of Saint Andrew falls on a Sunday, it is Transferred to the first free day.

Mass: Dóminus secus.

The Gloria is never said at Masses with Violet Vestments.
If Advent has not begun, Second Collect: Saint Saturninus.
Third Collect: Concéde.
If Advent has begun, Second Collect: Of The Feria.
Third Collect: Saint Saturninus.





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